English Bulldog with Dwarfism: Everything you should know about Miniature English Bulldogs

Updated: Jan 1

Table of contents:

  • Miniature English Bulldogs

  • How to know you have an English Bulldog with Dwarfism

  • Are English Bulldogs with Dwarfism prone to health issues?

  • How are miniature English Bulldogs bred?

  • Is breeding miniature English Bulldogs unethical?

  • Conclusion

In recent years, miniature dogs have become somewhat of a fashion accessory for people, with their demand ever increasing and their prices sky rocketing which means more and more breeds catering to the trend.


English Bulldogs with Dwarfism are becoming more frequent as breeders look to create more miniature English Bulldogs.


English Bulldogs are a well known breed with lots of health issues, and unfortunately miniature English Bulldogs are worse. They are unethically inbred passing health issues throughout their blood lines and with the addition of dwarfism - their health issues are multiplied.


Miniature English Bulldogs


Often called Teacup Bulldogs, miniature English Bulldogs are purebred English Bulldogs with dwarfism or Achondroplasia (a form of short-limbed dwarfism).


Miniature English Bulldogs are bred by either cross-breeding an English Bulldog and a pug, an English Bulldog and a Boston Terrier or two English Bulldogs with dwarfism.


On average, a miniature English Bulldog will weigh between 25 - 40 pounds and they'll reach up to 10 to 14 inches at the shoulders. This is only 2 inches smaller, and 15 pounds lighter than the average English Bulldog.


The miniature English Bulldog is identical in looks to the standard English Bulldog with a deep chest, rounded ribs, broad shoulders, and short snout.


Miniature English Bulldogs were originally bred in the 1980s and they are not recognized as a distinct breed by the largest organization, the American Kennel Club (AKC).


How to know you have an English Bulldog with Dwarfism


Dwarfism is a genetic and hereditary condition, and it's fairly easy to detect if you have an English Bulldog with dwarfism.


The signs that you have an English Bulldog with dwarfism are:

  1. Smaller Puppy: A puppy with dwarfism will be easily recongnisable due to the fact that they will be the much smaller of the litter

  2. Delayed Growth: A puppy with dwarfism will have delayed growth compared to the rest of the litter. Dogs with dwarfism tend to keep their fluffy puppy fur and have a smaller, stunted appearance.

  3. Facial deformities or abnormalities: Many of the early signs of dwarfism in dogs involve delayed growth and misshapen bone structure on the head and face. Keep an eye out for Puppy teeth that don't fall out, bulging eyes, disproportionately large jaw bones and Large blocky head in proportion to body.

  4. Look for signs of megaesophagus: Megaesophagus is an occasional symptom of dwarfism in dogs. Dogs with the condition have a larger esophagus than average and struggle to swallow and digest their food. Consequently, they often vomit after eating and are frequently underweight and may appear malnourished.


Are English Bulldogs with Dwarfism prone to health issues?


English Bulldogs with Dwarfism are prone to health issues, yes. In addition to the long list of health issues that English Bulldogs already suffer from, Dwarf English Bulldogs are also prone to the health issues listed below.

  • Aortic Stenosis: A heart disease involving narrowing of the aortic valve.

  • Cleft Palate: Where the sides of the roof of a dog's mouth do not close. This can cause respiratory problems and difficulty eating.

  • Cryptorchidism: When one or both of a dog's testicles have not descended and may require surgery.

  • Ectopic Ureter: Urinary bladder problems that can lead to urinary incontinence. It may require surgery to treat.

  • Eye problems: Cherry eye, dry eye, trichiasis and entropion, which can all lead to difficulties with vision and even blindness, as well as eye irritation.

  • Hemivertebrae: A deformity of the dog's spine that causes "screw tail."

  • Hip dysplasia: A painful condition involving a dog's bones and joints in the hips.

  • Hypoplastic trachea: A genetic condition where a dog's trachea is too narrow and can cause breathing problems and coughing.

  • Patellar and elbow luxation: An orthopedic condition where the dog's knee and elbow caps are out of place and require surgical correction.

  • Pododermatitis: When a dog's feet and paws become irritated due to allergies, infections, tumors, or other diseases.

  • Pulmonary edema: Fluid in the dog's lungs and can be associated with heart failure.

  • Pulmonic Stenosis: A congenital problem with a dog's heart. The dog's pulmonary valve is too narrow and it can lead to heart failure.

  • Sacrocaudal dysgenesis A congenital defect of the dog's spine that causes a dog to be born without a tail.

  • Urethrorectal fistula: A condition present at birth where the dog's urethra is too narrow.


How are miniature English Bulldogs bred?


Miniature English Bulldogs are bred by either cross-breeding an English Bulldog and a pug, an English Bulldog and a Boston Terrier or two English Bulldogs with dwarfism.


Is breeding miniature English Bulldogs unethical?


Breeding miniature English Bulldogs is unethical, it often requires in-breeding and breeding unhealthy, issue prone English Bulldogs to create a dog which will live a short and painful life purely due to achieve a slightly smaller version of its original build.


English Bulldogs are already a dog breed that have seen their health issues rise due to continued inbreeding to achieve specific physical characteristics that we now all associate with an English Bulldog.


Conclusion


An English Bulldog with dwarfism will require a lot of care, attention and will likely suffer from plenty of health issues throughout their life.


If you are thinking about purchasing a miniature English Bulldog then we recommend that you do not, they are unethically bred and have various additional health conditions.

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